Media Highlights

National Science Foundation tours Xandem's booth at CES 2014 [Video]

The National Science Foundation recently put together a video tour of Xandem at the Consumer Electronics Show in Las Vegas, 2014. See the video below.

Xandem TMD wins "CE Pro Best" Product award

CE Pro BestWe’re excited to announce that Xandem was awarded the CE Pro - Best Electronics Technologies award at CEDIA 2013 in Denver! For those of you who didn’t get a chance to visit us at CEDIA, no problem… check out the video below for a quick tour.

Visit Xandem at CEDIA 2013 in Denver, CO on September 26-28

CEDIA Hidden GemsXandem will be an exhibitor at the 2013 CEDIA Expo on September 26-28, 2013 in Denver, CO. We're excited to show off our tomographic motion detection (TMD) systems during a continuous live demonstration at booth #3930.

Xandem TMD is the most powerful and aesthetic (completely hidden) motion sensing system on the market. It installs inside walls or behind furniture, can see through walls and obstructions, provides unbeatable full-coverage sensing, and is very immune to false triggering. Your clients will never have to look at an ugly motion detector again! Applications include high-end automation, control, energy efficiency and security.

CEPro has identified Xandem as a "Hidden Gem" for the show. Check out the article here.

KUTV News: Utah startup Xandem creates state-of-the-art security system [Video]

(KUTV) The point of a security system is to keep crooks away, but despite the latest technology no system seems to be 100% foolproof. However, one Utah entrepreneur disagrees.

Inc. Magazine says Xandem will "blow your mind"

From Inc. Magazine:

"You won't find apps or Angry Birds here. Check out five ambitious companies pursuing big, bold ideas.

The Idea: The typical motion detector with infrared sensors has weaknesses: It must be cleaned, it’s sensitive to temperature changes and dust, and it doesn’t work if obstructed or deployed in large open spaces. Salt Lake City-based Xandem has developed a new kind of technology that not only solves these problems but also has a superhero-like power: It can “see” through walls to sense movement. Co-founders Joey Wilson and Neal Patwari have won a number of innovation awards in the state of Utah that have largely funded the company since its inception four years ago. Xandem launched its first product in April with help from Salt Lake City angel investor Ryan Smith.

Mind-blowing factor: Intruders can’t beat this system: There is no place to hide from these small, card-size nodes because they can be embedded in walls, beams, and furniture. The technology could be used in households and commercial buildings, but the company also claims that it’s sensitive enough to protect government buildings that require the highest level of security."

Click here to read the full story

UEA integrator fits "invisible" system for smart home

Award-winning Tech startup Xandem has been causing quite a stir with its motion sensor system that ‘sees through walls’. The US-based company produces plastic nodes the size of credit cards that can be embedded in walls or even furniture – meaning you end up with an invisible security system.

“The demand came for a completely invisible means to detect presence,” says Nathan Williams, director of Redwood. “The project required that even with a very high specification of smart home, very little technology should be on show due to the interior design implications.

“After much research, the Xandem solution stood out as being able to meet all of our requirements. We purchased a development kit which worked very well and so specified the solution for the project.”

Read the full story at ssngulf.com

SecurityInfoWatch: Xandem debuts new intrusion detection technology at ASIS 2012

Taking a new approach to perimeter security, Utah-based Xandem Technology is showcasing its intrusion detection technology this week at ASIS 2012 in Philadelphia.

The company, which was founded in late 2010 and has six employees, has developed a unique sensing technology that they’ve dubbed "Tomographic Motion Detection" or TMD for short. According to Dr. Joey Wilson, the company’s founder and CEO, the technology works similar to that of CT scan used in the medical field.

Read the whole story on SecurityInfoWatch.com

Xandem TMD featured in Security Systems News (SSN)

SSN Xandem

SALT LAKE CITY—Xandem is a startup company based here that’s attracted some mainstream media attention and technical awards, as well as interest among some security integrators who think the company’s motion sensor system may solve some common security problems.

Xandem makes playing-card-sized plastic nodes that can be embedded in walls, beams or furniture. The nodes form a mesh connection of sensors that can detect motion “through” walls, furniture and other obstacles.

Company founder and CEO Joey Wilson told Security Systems News that the "wireless mesh is not just to communicate, it’s actually to sense."

Read the entire story on SSN's website.

CNN Money: Xandem's security sensors can see through walls

(CNNMoney) -- Imagine a real-life version of Harry Potter's magical Marauder's Map, which showed the location of everyone prowling throughout Hogwarts castle. That's what startup Xandem is building: a new kind of all-seeing motion-detection system that's poised to shake up the security market.

Xandem founder Joey Wilson
Xandem founder Joey Wilson shows off the company's motion-detecting sensor nodes.

There are many different ways to track motion, but most commercial systems rely on optical beams that require uninterrupted sight lines. Heat-sensing infrared systems don't have that weakness, but they're prone to false alarms and can be blocked by anything that insulates body heat.

Read full article here

Xandem uses its super powers to take "Innovation Idol" title

With a fast-moving presentation and demonstration of wireless sensor technology that “looks” through walls, Joey Wilson of Xandem took the title of “Innovation Idol” at a Leonardo After Hours event in Salt Lake City event on December 7, 2011. An audience of 175 cast their votes for one of four innovative research and development projects in a speed pitch contest, and awarded Xandem with the first place prize.

Read the full article here

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